With over 30% of people in the United States affected by latex allergies, it is likely that you or someone you know has experienced the irritating symptoms. Latex gloves are most prominently used in the medical field, and statistics show that nearly 20% of medical workers and up to 68% of children who undergo multiple surgeries experience latex allergies. Keep in mind that anyone can develop a latex allergy at anytime. It is progressive and can get worse with each exposure. The only way to avoid latex allergy is avoidance.
 

This is obviously a common problem that ails many people, and here at Your Glove Source, we want to make sure that you are informed and able to protect yourself.

 

General Symptoms of Latex Glove Allergy

If you experience any of these symptoms after using latex gloves, you may have an allergy to latex.

  • Hives or welts

  • Swelling of the affected area

  • Sneezing

  • Runny nose

  • Red, itchy, or teary eyes

  • Wheezing, shortness of breath, or tightening of chest

  • Headache

  • Sore throat, hoarse voice

  • Abdominal cramps

 

 

Types of Latex Allergies

Type I: This is the most serious reaction because it can be life threatening. It is triggered after direct skin contact with latex. This reaction is medicated with an allergic antibody that combats the latex proteins. Symptoms of this particular type include hives, swelling of the skin, pinkeye, asthma, or anaphylaxis (fatal or non fatal).

 

Type IV: This reaction is not typically life threatening, but is still a major concern for medical personnel as well as their patients. This type of reaction usually takes place anywhere from 24-48 hours after the initial contact with latex. Since most people who experience this type of reaction are continually working with latex gloves, the symptoms can become chronic. Typically, the symptoms include a rash with skin that is red, inflamed, irritated, and possibly oozing.

 

Irritant Contact Dermatitis: This reaction is a common non-allergic reaction, experienced by a majority of people who use latex gloves. It is not to be confused with contact dermatitis; because this type is caused by frequent skin washing, as a result with repeated use of latex gloves. The symptoms typically include a rash where the skin is dry, red, and itchy.

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